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Without running OpenOffice instance, use AOO API in JAVA

PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 7:52 am
by sharsha
I am using open office 4 in my java application using bootstrapconnector.jar. But BootstrapSocketConnector.bootstrap(oooExeFolder), compusorily start a open office running instance in background.
Can we use open office api without running open office instance in background.

Re: Without running OpenOffice instance, use AOO API in JAVA

PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 9:51 am
by Zizi64
Can we use open office api without running open office instance in background.

The functions of the AOO/LO API are for controlling the office applications, and/or the documents. What you want to achieve by the API functions without one of the applications, or without any document?

Re: Without running OpenOffice instance, use AOO API in JAVA

PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 11:19 am
by sharsha
please check out this link : https://dzone.com/articles/integrate-openoffice-java it says if we use ODF Toolkit api, we will need not to install open office for creating open office documents like PDFs ..But for this we need to explore ODF Toolkit api. I just wished if OpenOffice.org API/Open office UNO api can provide the same facility of exporting PDFs without instantiating open office then it will be great.As I have already explored open office UNO api.

Re: Without running OpenOffice instance, use AOO API in JAVA

PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2018 8:45 pm
by grinder22
I am using CLI (.Net) rather than java. But most of the functionality seems to be the same.

I am using a call like this - XComponentContext xContext = uno.util.Bootstrap.bootstrap();

Provided the JAVA interface has the same thing, as long as Open Office and the SDK are installed, this should kick off an soffice process for you, rather than needing to start one yourself. I implement a disposable extension that kills the process after I'm done with it.

For what it's worth, I'm starting to lean toward leaving a background soffice service running instead. I think it will be more stable in the long run.